The most important thing to look for in a bedwetting alarm

by Karen Radford 1 min read

I am often asked by health care professionals and parents what is the most important feature of a bedwetting alarm? My answer is always- the sensor. The sensor is the part of the alarm that detects the urine and signals the alarm to wake the child.

A good sensor should have the features outlined in the table below. See how DRI Sleeper® Urosensors™ compare with the clip-on sensors which are standard in many other models. 

 

Feature DRI Sleeper® excel Urosensor™ DRI Sleeper® eclipse Urosensor™ Clip-on Sensors
Placement inside underpants for quick detection of urine leakage

Can be used in pull-ups or diapers
Ideal size for maximum detection of urine, particularly for boys

Easy to clean & dry for instant re-use
Sensing strips on both sides of the sensor for maximum detection of urine
Non-corrosive in urine
Doesn't cause acidification of urine and skin irritation
Ideal for restless sleepers and older children  

If you want to know more about our patened Urosensors™ please get in touch.

Karen Radford
Karen Radford



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